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Huge 13ft monster croc ‘Herbie’ terrorises town ‘thrashing’ at locals & swallowing animals whole before being caught

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A HUGE crocodile who terrorised an entire town after “thrashing” at locals and swallowing farm animals has finally been caught.

The 13-foot-long reptile dubbed “Herbie” found its way to north Queensland after evading capture for almost a month.

The monster crocodile (pictured) was evading capture for a month

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The monster crocodile (pictured) was evading capture for a monthCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation
The wildlife officers capturing the wild beast

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The wildlife officers capturing the wild beastCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation
Experts had set up a gated trap alongside the river to catch the wild beast

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Experts had set up a gated trap alongside the river to catch the wild beastCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation
The crocodile is now being sent to a zoo

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The crocodile is now being sent to a zooCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation

The saltwater beast was seen lingering around Herbert River – infamous for croc infestation – as it followed the local people and attempted to attack one resident.

It even targeted and attacked farm animals – and swallowed three whole chickens.

Lawrence Perticato, who lives alongside the croc-infested river, said he first spotted the wild beast in his backyard while he was mowing his lawn.

He said he noticed a “dramatic” change in the croc’s behaviour after it “thrashed and had a go” at him.

Lawrence, who reported the crocodile to authorities, told the ABC: “He started to come for us and stalk us on the riverbank here.

“I’ve lived on the river all my life and have become accustomed to crocodiles, and I know when there’s a dangerous one.

“With this guy stalking us the way he had been, it became very concerning.”

He added that he has stopped fishing in the river since the horror incident.

“I [usually] do a lot of fishing here in the river [but] haven’t been able to put my boat in because it’s just too dangerous.”

After Lawrence reported the crocodile to the authorities, wildlife officers soon came in and captured the beast using a gated trap on the river bank.

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Tony Frisby, senior wildlife officer, described how they caught the mighty beast.

He said: “When we observed the behaviour of the crocodile, we targeted it for removal from the wild.

“We tried an in-river floating trap but due to the amount of rainfall and elevated river levels, we had to install a gated trap, which is a trap that rests on the riverbank.

“On 24 March, our remote camera confirmed the crocodile had entered the gated trap.”

With this guy stalking us the way he had been, it became very concerning

Lawrence Perticatolocal resident

Wildlife officer Ella Meeve said removing the animal was a relief, as a croc that size “absolutely poses a significant risk to human life”.

She added that the croc was not at all happy being caught – and growled ferociously at the wildlife rescue team.

“We are all very relieved that we have now removed that animal, she said.

“He was not very thrilled [to be caught]. He was very vocal – there were a lot of growls and bellows.”

Ella Meeve, one of the wildlife officers, said the Department of Environment, Science and Innovation had been trying to capture the crocodile for a long time now.

The officer also said the incident could have turned out to be “bad news”.

“Three-point-nine metres is a big animal so that absolutely poses a significant risk to human life,” she said.

“If people were to walk too close to the water, it could have been bad news.”

The wildlife officers also captured a second crocodile in a trap in the Ross River.

Both the reptiles are now being moved to crocodile farms or zoos.

However, experts warned locals that other crocodiles could still emerge from the Herbert River.

“People must understand that the removal of these crocodiles does not make the Herbert River or the Ross River safer,” Frisby said.

“The Townsville region is croc country, and people should [be] making sensible choices around waterways and avoiding complacency.”

The wildlife officers also captured a second crocodile that measured 9ft long

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The wildlife officers also captured a second crocodile that measured 9ft longCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation
The second crocodile was captured in a trap in the Ross River in Townsville

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The second crocodile was captured in a trap in the Ross River in TownsvilleCredit: Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation

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