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Horror vid shows countless coffins of Putin’s war dead with body count so high they fly on world’s largest military jet

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RARE footage shows countless coffins of Vladimir Putin’s dead fighters stacked on top of each other, ready to be taken to families.

The confronting video was filmed at a yard in the Russian city of Rostov-on-Don, nearly two years into the full-scale war in Ukraine.

Dozens of new coffins with slain Russian men are filmed in Rostov-on-Don, south of Russia, by Russia’s border with Ukraine

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Dozens of new coffins with slain Russian men are filmed in Rostov-on-Don, south of Russia, by Russia’s border with UkraineCredit: East2West
It is illegal under Putin's laws to show such imagery in case people question his decision to launch the war

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It is illegal under Putin’s laws to show such imagery in case people question his decision to launch the warCredit: East2West
Coffins are unloaded from a Ruslan An-124 plane in Neryungri

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Coffins are unloaded from a Ruslan An-124 plane in NeryungriCredit: East2West

It is understood the corpses of Putin’s soldiers are collected for transport back to relatives across Russia’s 11 time zones, and that Ruslan An-124 planes – the world’s largest military jets – are used to deliver coffins to Siberia.

Video of the wooden boxes was discreetly filmed by a Russian military man.

It is illegal under Putin’s laws to showcase the reality of his war in Ukraine in such a way, as doing so might lead people to question his decision to launch the full-scale invasion.

Prominent independent journalist Alexander Nevzorov called attention to the macabre sight while claiming Putin will attempt to secure a victory in Avdiivka, a war-blitzed city in Donetsk region, by any means necessary.

Read more on the Ukraine war

He said: “The approaches to Avdiivka have long become a huge mass grave of [Putin’s fighters].

“But now the Russians are covering the area with a new carpet of their corpses.”

Ukraine is reported to have pushed back and prevented the largest number of Russian attacks on the Avdiivka front in 24 hours: 30, with a total of 66 combat engagements.

Mr Nevzorov said there was no military reason Putin wanted to “liberate” the city, stating: “At all polling stations, ballot boxes must bow before the crazy king of corpses…

“The fights are crazy.

“Orcs [Russian fighters] climb over the corpses of their comrades, ‘forward to the victory of Putinism’.”

In separate footage, the booming voice of a man last month claimed an An-124 Ruslan plane, which is designed for heavy loads, had arrived at Neryungri Airport filled with the bodies of dead soldiers.

He said: “They are all our boys from Yakutsk, 26 men.

“We’ve loaded two trucks, mine and Tolik’s. Sixteen other bodies have already been taken.

“And another nine [coffins] were loaded into a Kamaz truck.

“We are now to transport [the coffins] to the railway to load the boys into train carriages.”

A wooden coffin could be seen travelling by conveyor belt from the belly of the plane to the tray of a truck as the man spoke.

Two other vehicles carrying coffins sat parked to the right of the aircraft as men wearing coats and large winter caps watched on.

Neryungri, a remote town of 60,000 people in the world’s coldest inhabited region, Yakutia, is seven time zones east of the war zone.

Putin is estimated to have lost more than 300,000 troops since he declared war in February 2022.

Mr Nevzorov added that while there were “countless” corpses in the Rostov-on-Don yard, featured in the video, “three-quarters of the Russian dead remain in the fields and amid the ruins”.

He said: “The counting of losses has stopped.

“There are so many corpses that it has lost all meaning.”

The rare footage was filmed surreptitiously by a Russian military man

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The rare footage was filmed surreptitiously by a Russian military manCredit: East2West
Coffins are stacked on top of each other in trucks as more are unloaded from the plane

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Coffins are stacked on top of each other in trucks as more are unloaded from the planeCredit: East2West

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