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3D printer constructs stunning data center hands-free in 140 hours

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In the heart of Germany, a groundbreaking project has emerged, marrying the worlds of technology and architecture in a way never seen before.

The Wave House, a new data center located in an urban area of Heidelberg, stands as a testament to innovation, being Europe’s largest 3D-printed building to date.

Data centers, the backbone of our digital lives, are often relegated to nondescript, windowless buildings due to security and operational requirements. However, the push to bring these essential facilities closer to urban centers demanded a rethink in their design approach.

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Enter the Wave House, which challenges the status quo with its visually arresting wave-designed walls — a feature that not only lends the building its name but also marks a significant departure from conventional data center aesthetics. It measures 6,600 sq. ft. and was designed by SSV and Mense Korte and created by Peri 3D Construction for developer KrausGruppe.

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The distinctive curvature of the Wave House’s walls could not have been achieved through traditional building methods. Instead, the project leveraged 3D construction printing technology, specifically the COBOD BOD2 printer.

This machine pushed out a recyclable cement-like mixture to form the building’s exterior. Achieving an impressive rate of 43 square feet per hour, the printer completed the walls in just 140 hours, demonstrating the efficiency and versatility of 3D printing in modern construction.

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Beyond its aesthetic appeal, the Wave House represents a stride forward in sustainable building practices. The 3D-printed construction process emits significantly less CO2 compared to traditional methods, aligning with global efforts to reduce the environmental footprint of new developments.

Furthermore, the project showcases the potential for reducing costs and construction times, making it a compelling case study for future urban planning initiatives.

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A milestone for 3D-printed architecture

The inauguration of the Wave House not only marks a significant advancement for the construction industry but also signals the growing acceptance of 3D-printed architecture in mainstream applications. From earthquake-resistant homes to ambitious developments of 100 3D-printed houses, the technology is proving its worth across a diverse range of projects.

COBOD, the company behind the technology, aims to automate at least 50% of building site processes, promising efficiency gains and potentially reshaping the labor landscape in construction.

The Wave House in Heidelberg is more than just a data center; it’s a symbol of architectural innovation and a showcase for the potential of 3D printing in construction. By blending functionality with style, the project addresses the evolving needs of urban infrastructure and sets a new standard for data centers worldwide. As 3D printing technology continues to evolve, we can expect to see more projects that challenge traditional architectural norms, offering sustainable, efficient and visually compelling solutions for the cities of tomorrow.

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Original article source: 3D printer constructs stunning data center hands-free in 140 hours

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